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Reflections on Horse Ownership

How to Avoid Emotional Decisions

by Karen Pickering

 

Photo credit fairytailphotography.smugmug.com.

Every year I write about New Year’s resolutions. It just seems fitting to start over in January, whether it’s a new diet, a resolve to ride more, or an entire laundry list of things to change. It seems fitting to pause and reflect. I’m writing this right after the Thanksgiving holiday, but am reminded to consider what I have in my life already.

We tend to look at what’s wrong, what needs to be fixed or improved upon instead of reflecting on the good things we have in our lives. In a time of instant messaging, instant gratification and an attitude that things are disposable, it’s common to think, “If it’s broke, don’t fix it get a new one!” Often our horses are treated in the same manner. In today’s marketplace the decision to breed or buy has become more difficult. The thought of owning a baby from that favorite mare of yours can be tempting, but have you carefully considered the cost of raising a foal? Perhaps this is best left in the hands of experienced breeders.

When purchasing a horse we still need to proceed carefully: What type of riding or activity will you be doing? Have you studied the pedigree for genetic concerns? Is the temperament suitable for you? Take your time and be cautious when adding to your herd.

In my experience (after raising several foals) it is far more expensive to raise a horse than buy one. It was fun and rewarding, but also heartbreaking. The last horse I purchased was a yearling and I still have her today. Though I wouldn’t trade her for the world the purchase was emotional, not carefully considered. What has your horse purchasing experience been like? Send me an email (info@nwhorsesource.com); I’d love to hear about it. In the subject line put “my horse purchasing experience.”

Happy New Year!

Quote: “The main cause for failure and unhappiness is trading what you want most for what you want at the moment.”

~Author Unknown

 

Published January 2013 Issue

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